Kizer Drop Bear is Laden with New Knife Tech

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Kizer Drop Bear is Laden with New Knife Tech

Kizer has a new knife on the way, and it is positively loaded w

Kizer has a new knives/blades/knives.html" 15179 target="_blank">knife on the way, and it is positively loaded with fresh mechanical features. The Drop Bear, designed by Azo Mai, marks Kizer’s first crack at an Axis Lock-style knives/blades/knives.html" 15179 target="_blank">knife, spiced up with unique some in-house enhancements.

Most of the focus here is on the mechanical stuff, so we’ll get the specifications of the knives/blades/knives.html" 15179 target="_blank">knife itself out of the way first. The Drop Bear is everyday carry ready, fitted with a symmetrical, wide spear point blade. It’s spec’d for maximum legality too at a blade length of 2.97 inches. Opened with a thumb stud (which pairs nicely with the ambidextrous Clutch Lock), the Drop Bear blade’s made from 154CM, a steel to which Kizer is still partial, and for good reason: the old favorite has transitioned gracefully from sought after, custom knife-grade steel into widely available, well-rounded mid-tier performer.

Here’s Kizer’s breakdown of all the features on the Drop Bear

The handle shape is completely straightforward, with all the complication located under the hood. The plain, flexible profile welcomes just about any grip, the aluminum scales provide adequate traction and durability without contributing overmuch to the Drop Bear’s weight (3.68 oz. total), and the reversible, tip up deep carry pocket clip is made from stamped steel.

All well and good, but what about that lock? Well, Kizer calls it the Clutch Lock, and it is, of course, their take on the Axis Lock. On a fundamental level it works no differently than that Jason Williams/Bill McHenry classic: a cross-bar, kept under tension with two omega springs, moves up to lock the blade in place when the knives/blades/knives.html" 15179 target="_blank">knife is opened.

But the real kicker here is the extra stuff designer Azo Mai added around that familiar core. First of all, the Drop Bear’s scales are designed to be easily removed, separate from the liners housing the lock; this allows for much easier maintenance and adjustment – the latter being another point of focus with the Drop Bear. The Gemini Spring System, as Kizer calls it, is a series of anchor points, five on each liner, for their respective spring. Once the scales are off, users can tweak the tension of the springs independently to suit their tastes.

It’s a promising setup, and one that will be interesting to play around with. As for when we’ll be able to do that, Kizer hasn’t given a firm release date for the Drop Bear yet. It’s part of the 2022 class though, so we should see it sometime this year.

knives/blades/knives.html" 15179 target="_blank">Knife in Featured Image: Kizer Cutlery Drop Bear


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